PropellerSafety.com

Archive for Propeller Accident Statistics Comments

USCG Recreational-Boating-Statistics-2016

USCG Recreational-Boating-Statistics-2016

U.S. Coast Guard recently released their annual 2016 recreational boating accident statistics report.

Total counts for 2016 Coast Guard Boating Accident Report Database (BARD) reported accidents were considerably higher than in 2016.

2016 USCG BARD reported accident statistics were 4,463 accidents, 2903 injuries, and 701 fatalities.

2015 USCG stats were 4,158 accidents, 2,613 injuries, and 626 fatalities.

For 2016 USCG reported 171 propeller accidents, 175 propeller injuries, and 24 fatalities.

2015 USCG stats were 158 propeller accidents, 150 propeller injuries, and 27 propeller fatalities.

Thanks to all those at USCG whose efforts helped make this annual statistical report of boating accidents possible.

We would also like to thank USCG, law enforcement officials, lake patrols, first responders, nurses and physicians, those offering boating safety classes, boat safety equipment check points, safe boaters, state boating law administrators, life jacket loaner program participants, Operation Dry Water, those spreading boating safety messages, and all others who work tirelessly to drive these annual totals down.

Plus thanks to all the state boating law administrators and all the officers in the field filling out the accident reports, and to the individuals that self reported their accidents.


Print Friendly

Its been about two years since we updated the List of Over the Bow Pontoon Boat Propeller Accidents, many of which result from bow riding / bowriding.

The recent cluster of pontoon boat propeller accidents, 6 media reported accidents in 8 days in late July and early August, followed by the Kaden Frederick fatality, the chaos at Ocean City Maryland following several accidents there, combined with our earlier efforts at trying to prevent these accidents, and a possibility to get some attention focused on this issue caused us to update the list.

The new version is two pages long, includes 198 incidents, some of which included multiple propeller strikes.

Pontoon Boat anchor on shore

Pontoon Boat anchored on shore

We tried to limit the list to only over the bow prop accidents on pontoon boats. There are numerous other ways to get struck by the propeller of a pontoon boat, but this is the leading cause, and the cause that most often involves children. Read More→

Print Friendly

Pontoon boat propeller accidents tend to pileup in the summer months. But the recent cluster of 6 media reported pontoon boat propeller accidents in 8 days should be a wake up call for change. As always, these are media reports, exact circumstances may not be correct and things may change by issue of actual official boat accident reports, however pontoon boats were involved and people were thought to be struck by the boat or propeller:

  • 30 July 2016 – Natalya Potsurko, 26 year old female, struck off Ocean City Maryland. Standing on bow of a rental pontoon when it hit a wake, she fell overboard and was struck by the propeller in the face and leg. news clip
  • 1 August – Pamela K. Portillo, 53 of Iowa, struck in Stockton Lake in Missouri August 1st. Pontoon boat gate gave way, propeller struck her legs, one since amputated below the knee. news clip
  • 3 August – Jesse Nicholas Cardone, 19, struck in Maine on Long Lake. Boating with his family and another family, fell from front of pontoon boat, boat passed over him, his body was recovered late the next day using sidescan sonar. news clip
  • 6 August – Kevin Theodore Husum, of Florida, struck on Lake Lanier in Georgia. He was throwing a football to another boat, jumped off, ended up under the boat, and struck by the propeller. Authorities are still searching for his body. newsclip
  • 6 August – a boy less than 10 years old struck in Massachusetts. His legs were struck by the propeller of the pontoon boat that took him out on the Beaver Lake to swim. news clip
  • 6 August – Wilmer Ramirez-Escalante, 20 year old male, struck at Isle of Wight Bay in Maryland. Rental pontoon boat ran aground, officers found several people in the water including a man bleeding profusely from an artery in his arm after being struck by the propeller. news clip

Pontoon boat on Keystone Lake in July 2016

Pontoon boat on Keystone Lake near Manford Oklahoma on 2 July 2016

Read More→

Print Friendly

USCG 2015 Recreational Boating Statistics cover

USCG 2015 Recreational Boating Statistics

U.S. Coast Guard recently released their annual 2015 recreational boating accident statistics report. Total counts for 2015 BARD reported accidents were 4,158 accidents, 2,613 injuries, and 626 fatalities.

USCG reported 158 propeller accidents, 150 propeller injuries, and 27 propeller fatalities.

We would like to thank USCG for all the efforts they put into this annual statistical report of boating accidents.

We would also like to thank USCG, law enforcement officials, lake patrols, first responders, nurses and physicians, those offering boating safety classes, boat safety equipment check points, safe boaters, state boating law administrators, life jacket loaner program participants, Operation Dry Water, and all others who work tirelessly to drive these annual totals down.

Plus thanks to all the state boating law administrators and all the officers in the field filling out the accident reports, and to the individuals that self reported their accidents.


Print Friendly

We updated our Outboard Motor Struck Submerged Object and Flipped Into Boat list today (2 May 2016).

We still have many more to add to the list above plus the 2015 U.S. Coast Guard Boating Accident Report Database (BARD) will be out with more soon as well.

We also updated our list of Bass Boat Outboard Motor Struck Submerged Object & Flipped into Boat list today (2 May 2016).

Several of these accidents resulted in propeller injuries or fatalities.

We encourage those working on preventing these accidents to view our paper titled, Approaches to Prevent Outboard Motors From Flipping Into Boats After Striking Floating or Submerged Objects. We also have considerable additional information that had not yet been integrated into that report.


Print Friendly

USCG 2014 Recreational Boating Statistics

USCG 2014 Recreational Boating Statistics

U.S. Coast Guard released their annual recreational boating accident statistics report on Wednesday May 13th, 2015. Total counts for 2014 BARD reported accidents were 4,064 accidents, 2,678 injuries, and 610 fatalities.

USCG reported 153 propeller accidents, 148 propeller injuries, and 22 propeller fatalities.

We would like to thank USCG for all the efforts they put into this annual statistical report of boating accidents.

We would also like to thank USCG, law enforcement officials, lake patrols, first responders, nurses and physicians, those offering boating safety classes, boat safety equipment check points, safe boaters, state boating law administrators, life jacket loaner program participants, Operation Dry Water, and all others who work tirelessly to drive these annual totals down.


Print Friendly

This series of posts discusses the duty of boat manufacturers, marine drive manufacturers, and other boating product manufacturers to monitor their products after sale to identify potential safety issues. Manufacturers are legally required to warn boaters (customers) of significant risks discovered after sale.

These posts are NOT professional legal advice. They were written to stimulate action and discussion on these topics.

A major resource for monitoring boat and marine drive accidents after sale is the U.S. Coast Guard Boating Accident Report Database (BARD).

This series of articles reveals as many as 32 to 45 percent of accidents annually reported to USCG are invisible in the BARD database as supplied to manufacturers and safety experts. This articles call for making those accidents visible, and explain how that could be done.

Our in-depth coverage is divided into 5 segments.

1. Handout summarizing our coverage
 
2. Post Sale Duty to Monitor Product Risks / Accidents: Boating Industry
 
3. Moral Responsibility to Monitor Products Post Sale: Boating Industry
 
4. How to Monitor Boating Product Accidents / Risks Post Sale
 
5. Full access to BARD is CRITICAL for monitoring product safety after sale
 
6. We encourage you to return to item #1 the summary handout


Read More→

Print Friendly

Recalls from USCG Boating Safety Circular 87

Recalls from USCG Boating Safety Circular 87

Manufacturers are morally responsible for monitoring post sale accidents of their products and warning customers of those risks when they become significant.

Some manufacturers claim their monitoring costs (dollars and manpower) would exceed any possible benefits received by monitoring, and others claim it is to costly or impossible to identify or communicate with users of their products.

While those are legitimate concerns, some level of monitoring is typically still possible, and some means of notification is usually available as well (Press releases, company web site, trade shows, trade publications, distributors, etc.). Most would find it more unreasonable that a boating industry manufacturer was unable to take advantage of one or more of the monitoring opportunities listed on our Tools to Monitor Boating Products Post Sale page. Read More→

Print Friendly

Many opportunities exist for manufacturers of boating products to monitor their products after sale for previously unknown safety issues, risk, and hazards.

The legal, regulatory, and moral obligations to monitor boating products post sale / post market / conduct post sale surveillance and vigilance are detailed in two previous posts.

This series of posts is NOT legal advice. The articles were written to stimulate action and conversation on this topic

This post is part of a series of posts. Links to the other posts can be found in the Introduction.

Below we will discuss some of the major sources and opportunities for post sale marketing, then conclude with an extensive list of those sources. Read More→

Print Friendly

2013 BARD query sample

2013 BARD query sample

Before anyone gets caught up in the title and thinks we are asking for full access to private information in BARD, please put that to rest. We are not calling for access to Personally Identifying Information (PII). We are calling for access to accidents that are hidden from view.

This post is part of a series of posts. Links to the other posts can be found in the Introduction.

As laid out in our recent series of articles:

  • Boating industry manufacturers have legal obligation in the U.S. to report significant safety hazards discovered by them post sale to the U.S. Coast Guard and to take appropriate actions.
  • The legal duty (responsibility) boating manufacturers in the U.S. owe their U.S. customers to actively monitor their products post sale and warn existing owners of significant safety risks discovered post sale is currently in a state of flux. Some states/courts say yes, some courts say no, some courts base decisions on circumstances (size of manufacturer, ability to identify and warn customers, cost to warn vs. risk, etc.), others directly apply the Third Restatement of Torts.
  • In the European Union (EU) boating industry manufacturers have a regulatory obligation to actively monitor their products post sale and to warn their customers of significant safety risks identified post sale meeting certain criteria. The E.U. defines a stringent criteria for such monitoring.

    Product Safety in Europe: A Guide to Corrective Action Including Recalls
     

    “Producers and distributors must have procedures for monitoring problems with their products. This means you need to have systems to collect and analyze the following information:

    • Reports of accidents involving your products
    • Complaints from customers, directly or via retailers
    • Warranty claims
    • Insurance claims or legal actions
    • Non-compliances reported by the company’s quality control procedures or by other organisations
    • Results of product testing
    • Information from service engineers
    • Reports on returned components and products
    • Any evidence of hazards arising from sales to unexpected user groups
    • Any evidence of consumer abuse or misuse of the product
    • Any evidence of malicious tampering with products

     
    This information needs to be reviewed regularly for signs that there may be a risk to consumers from any of the company’s products. This is especially important when the design of products changes or new component suppliers are used. If distributors have this information, they should share it with producers.”

  • Boating industry manufacturers have a moral obligation to monitor the post sale performance of their products in the U.S. for significant safety issues and protect their customers by warning then, recalling the products, or taking other appropriate actions.
  • U.S. Coast Guard Boating Accident Report Database, BARD, is or should be a leading external source for monitoring boating accidents for most boat builders and marine drive manufacturers in the United States.

Read More→

Print Friendly